Periodontal Therapy

At your evaluation, you and your dentist will discuss the findings, treatment recommendations, and answer any questions you may have.

If you have been diagnosed with and treated for periodontal (gum) disease, regularly scheduled supportive therapy is vitally important to your success in management of disease progression. According to the American Academy of Periodontology, “following a course of active periodontal treatment and periodic ongoing care at regularly prescribed intervals is essential. Because periodontal disease or infection can recur, continuous maintenance is absolutely necessary to prevent this periodontal infection from becoming active once again and destroying what healing has occurred.

The following treatment is included in your periodontal maintenance appointment:

  • Evaluation of oral health to detect subtle signs of disease recurrence
  • Appropriate debridement of teeth and gums (professional cleaning and polishing)
  • Antimicrobial therapy to destroy impossible to reach bacteria as deemed necessary by your doctor
  • Evaluation of home care regimes and aids
  • Oral health evaluation including oral cancer screening, necessary dental radiographs, and decay detection
  • Recommendations based on individual needs as a result of medical and dental histories review

Scientific studies support the belief of experts that the most important aspect of periodontal treatment is the long term maintenance therapy. Individuals vary in their response to periodontal disease and resistance to the disease varies at different times of life. When periodontal disease recurs following treatment, it may do so without signs or symptoms to you, the patient. We are well trained in recognizing the very subtle signs that may signal detrimental changes.

Oral Cancer Screening

With early detection from a routine oral cancer screening, there is a 90% success rate after diagnosis.

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Q: My gums bleed. Why is this?

A: Gums affected by periodontal disease become red and inflamed, often bleeding during brushing or flossing. Gingivitis is a disease process involving one the soft tissue around the teeth. Timely treatment can reverse these conditions. However, if these conditions are ignored, your periodontal disease can worsen, becoming a condition called periodontitis. Periodontitis is much more difficult to treat.

Periodontitis affects your gums, bone and teeth in a manner that cannot be reversed. To prevent tooth loss, you will require more extensive, specialized treatment. If left untreated, periodontitis results in tooth loss. If undiagnosed and untreated, you may require extensive surgery to save your teeth and potentially place yourself at risk for other serious health problems.

Q: My gums bleed after I brush. Should I be concerned?

A: Your gums should not bleed when you brush your teeth. It is certainly not desirable to have bleeding gums following brushing; however, the condition may or may not require attention, depending on the source of the problem. Bleeding gums can be caused by any of the following: improper, rough “scrubbing” instead of gentle, circular brushing motions; using a hard-bristled toothbrush instead of a soft one; plaque and/or calculus/tartar build-up below the gum line; or, gum sensitivity and inflammation due to gingivitis or periodontal disease. If this problem persists despite correct brushing and flossing methods, or if it occurs every time you brush, contact our office to schedule an evaluation.

Q: What is periodontal disease?

A: Gums affected by gingivitis become red and inflamed, often times bleeding during eating, brushing or flossing. If treated in a timely manner, these conditions can be reversed, preventing periodontitis from developing. Periodontitis is much more difficult to treat.

Periodontitis affects your gums, bone, and teeth in a manner that cannot be reversed. To prevent tooth loss, you will require more extensive, specialized treatment from your general dentist or even from a specialist If left untreated, periodontitis results in tooth loss – your teeth either fall out on their own or must be extracted. If you don’t catch periodontitis in its early stages, you may require extensive surgery to save your teeth and may put yourself at risk for other serious health problems.

According to Caesy Dental Education, “Ailments associated with periodontal disease include respiratory disease, pneumonia, strokes, ulcers, difficult-to-control diabetes, low birth weight babies, and infective endocarditis – a dangerous infection of the heart valves. Researchers recently discovered that this chronic infection in your mouth creates an open doorway for toxins and bacteria to enter the bloodstream. These bacteria (Streptococcus sangguis) may cause blood clots that can block your arteries and even trigger a heart attack.”

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